Building Bridges

As the debate on the age of the Isthmus of Panama matures we respond to an eLetter.

Taken from Science Advances

8 November 2016

We thank Erkens and Hoorn for their constructive comments. Like us, they believe that collaboration between biologists, geologists and paleontologists focusing on data and analyses is required to unravel the history of the Isthmus of Panama. We agree with Erkens and Hoorn that the Continue reading

Historical records reveal that Caribbean coral reefs grow faster with more parrotfishes

screen-shot-2017-02-08-at-23-23-27Caribbean coral reefs have transformed into algal-dominated habitats over recent decades, but the mechanisms of change are unresolved due to a lack of quantitative ecological data before large-scale human impacts. To understand the role of reduced herbivory in recent coral declines, we produce a high-resolution 3,000 year record of reef Continue reading

New opportunities in the O’Dea lab

We are looking for three new interns/fellows to join the O’Dea lab. For more information download the flyers here: opportunities in the O’Dea lab

Project 1 (one position). Interoceanic differences in energy flow. Position open now, send CV and cover letter to odeaa@si.edu.

Project 2 (two positions). The ecological, life history and environmental differences between Holocene and modern Caribbean coral reef fish assemblages using fossil otoliths. To apply follow directions on the flyer.

Natural History of the Isthmus of Panama

Felix Rodriguez and I just published a compendium of papers in Spanish for students and non-scientists in Latin America. The book is called “Historia natural del Istmo de Panama” and features a suite of papers covering different topics from the geology of the Isthmus to the future of fishing along both coasts of Panama. The book will be on sale across the Isthmus. Let me know if you wish to purchase a copy.

My contribution can be downloaded here: Historia natural de los mares panameñosbook-HistoriaNat-mod

Form and life habit in cupuladriids

Since the late Mesozoic, several bryozoan groups have occupied unstable soft-sediment habitats by adopting a free-living and motile mode of life. Today, the free-living bryozoans often dominate epibenthic faunal communities in these expansive habitats, yet their biology and ecology remain poorly understood. This study examines their unique mode of life by exploring the relationship between form and function in the free-living Cupuladriidae of tropical America. Click on the image for the pdf of the paper.

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Upwelling in the Tropical Eastern Pacific

Most people think Panama has two seas – the Caribbean and the Pacific. In fact it has three and they are each very distinct. This paper presents detailed hydrological measurements from the two seas along the Pacific coast of Panama: the Gulf of Panama and the Gulf of Chiriqui, and characterizes the environmental differences between them. Click on the image for the pdf of the paper.

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