Nicte-Ha Muñoz

STRI Intern

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Nicte-Ha did her master’s  degree in marine biology at Reefs System Unit, UNAM, Mexico. There, she investigated the growth rates of fossil and modern corals as proxies to understand environmental change.

As an intern scientist of the O’Dea lab, Nicte-Ha expects to  gain a wider perspective on how the study of past marine environments can help to develop better strategies for conservation of current coral reef ecosystems that are under the current effects of human impacts.

Nicte has now moved on to the Altieri lab

Chien-Hsiang Lin

STRI Fellow

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I am a taxonomist and primarily use fish otoliths to explore systematic and ecological questions. Much of my work uses sea bottom otolith assemblages as a study system, but I also work on fossil materials to address their paleoecological, biogeographical and evolutionary aspects.

 

 

Melisa Chan

Intern (STRI and College of the Atlantic)

11057221_1200174916675890_4708391133992757548_nI am an undergraduate student at College of the Atlantic in Bar Harbor, Maine, pursuing a degree in Human Ecology with a concentration in marine biology. I am interested in the ecological relationship between sea turtles and the communities in which they belong. Subsequently, I hope to make further contributions to the restoration and conservation of both in my homeland, Malaysia.

At STRI I am assisting Mauro Lepore in quantifying the differences in community composition between fossil reefs and sub-recent reefs in Bocas del Toro. This internship will provide me with a new perspective to approach marine conservation: how the study of marine historical ecology can be utilized to better inform coral reef restoration and conservation efforts.

Graciela Quijano

STRI Intern

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Soy Bióloga egresada de la Universidad de Panamá con orientación a la biología animal. Estoy realizando una pasantía que va enfocada específicamente a la clasificación de los moluscos utilizando muestras de la costa del Pacífico así como del Caribe. En este proyecto manipulare organismos del registro fósil como modernos, separando las especies según caracteres morfológicos que me ayudaran a inferir entre familias y géneros. Teniendo en cuenta que los moluscos son un grupo muy diverso y complejo y el cual ha sufrido un proceso evolutivo muy interesante a lo largo de todo este tiempo.

Abhy Verdurmen

Intern (SENACYT, STRI, University of Panama)

DSCF4024I’m a Biology undergraduate student at University of Panama profoundly interested in Marine Biology and paleontology, especially the evolution, adaptation and ecology of coral reefs. I’m working on a project that consists of reconstructing the Caribbean reef fish communities of the past, and my master tools for this research are fish otoliths. Otoliths have distinct shapes that enable us to identify fish families, sometimes even to the level of species and fossil otoliths may help us reconstruct the reef fish community of the Caribbean 7000 years ago (i.e. before human impacts). This information will provide a baseline that will enable us to compare “pristine” with modern reef fish communities.

Abigail Kelly

STRI Pre-doc fellowDSCN1150 (1)

Abby is working on a project that explores how marine life, specifically molluscs, respond to the differing energy regimes of the Pacific and Caribbean sides of the Isthmus of Panama. The Pacific experiences coastal upwelling and high nutrient availability, corresponding to high productivity, while the Caribbean experiences no upwelling and low productivity. How do marine communities, which share many of the same species, differ between the Caribbean and Pacific sides?

 

Yamilla Samara

STRI Intern

PhotoI am a student at Keiser University in Nicaragua who will be transferring to FIU this year to pursue a degree in Marine Biology. I am working alongside Erin Dillon helping process fossil and modern sediment samples to find shark denticles and formulate a hypothesis of how shark communities were before humans. This will allow me to explore new areas of marine biology and gain experience doing research. It will also help me understand how fossils can be used to interpret the present.

Erin Dillon

PhD Student UC Santa Barbara and STRI Fellow

Reconstructing shark communities using dermal denticles preserved in reef sediments

What were shark communities like before humans? Ecological surveys and historical records demonstrate significant declines in Caribbean shark populations, yet pre-exploitation baselines are nonexistent. Dermal denticles – tiny, tooth-like scales lining the skin of elasmobranchs – can offer insight into shark communities on reefs. We have found denticles to be beautifully preserved in fossil and modern reef sediments, allowing morphometric analysis and classification. Denticle traits are also closely associated with shark ecology and can paint a picture of shark community composition. Evaluating the relative abundances of different denticle morphotypes in sediment samples across time and space can both supplement existing survey data – using time-averaged modern sediments – and assist in the reconstruction of pre-human shark baselines – using the recent fossil record. This previously unexplored data source may reveal what shark communities looked like prior to the advent of fishing, facilitating exciting and important assessments of the magnitude and ecological consequences of global shark declines and producing more meaningful conservation targets.

Save our seas         ~          Erin’s Website